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Ralph Breaks the Internet 3D

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USA | 2018 | 114mins | rating

  • Directed by Phil Johnston, Rich Moore
  • Starring John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, James Corden, Taraji P. Henson, Alan Tudyk, Jack McBrayer, Gal Gadot, Jane Lynch,
  • Phil Johnston, Paige O’Hara, Irene Bedard, Mandy Moore, Auli’i Cravalho, Kristen Bell, Kelly Macdonald
  • Written by Phil Johnston, Pamela Ribon
  • Studio Walt Disney Animation
  • Adventure, Comedy, Kids & Family, Science Fiction, 3D

Trailer

Showing

  • 26 Dec, Wednesday, 11AM NEW 
  • 27 Dec, Thursday, 2PM
  • 28 Dec, Friday, 11AM
  • 29 Dec, Saturday, 2PM
  • 30 Dec, Sunday, 11AM
  • 31 Dec, Monday, 2PM
  • 1 Jan, Tuesday, 11AM
  • 4 Jan, Friday 11AM
  • 7 Jan Monday 11AM
  • 9 Jan Wednesday 11AM
  • 15 Jan Tuesday 2PM

smart, charming and funny

John C. Reilly returns to lend his voice to the sequel to Disney’s 2012 3D animated adventure, along with Sarah Silverman, James Corden and an all-star voice cast.

Taking place six years following the events of the first film, the story centers on Ralph’s adventures in the Internet data space when a Wi-Fi router gets plugged into the arcade as he must find a replacement part to fix Sugar Rush.

“Within the Internet, Ralph and Vanellope have to square away a painful reality: how friendships inevitably change when life goals diverge. We see both characters explode with hope and possibility when they make their way through the Internet — but both also worry about what they may lose in their “best” friendship as a result.

“The Disney cartoon universe doesn’t often host these kinds of boy-and-girl stories, and it has never nailed one as sweet and vulnerable as this one. ” ArsTechnica

This is latter-day Disney doing what it does best: simultaneously playing to the kids with big action, slapstick comedy and spectacle while their parents get knowing nods to a more sophisticated adult worldview.
Winnipeg Free Press

The Disney cartoon universe doesn’t often host these kinds of boy-and-girl stories, and it has never nailed one as sweet and vulnerable as this one.
This is the cartoon-nerd story I’ve always wanted: one about kids discovering a dazzling, virtual world before learning surprising, even troubling things about themselves in the process.
ArsTechnica